Robert Clark Photograph - "First Rate Fakery"

Press photographer Robert Clark's photograph shows what look like a near perfect picture of a Boeing 767-200:







This photograph was awarded the prestigious World Press Photograph 1st Prize 2001 after being published in 'Time' only a few days after the attacks, along with other photographs from the series. At a quick glance we can see that there is no 'pod' or 'port wing anomaly'. The presence of two specular airframe reflections were validated by Flight Simulators 'dynamic reflectivity' function and the dimensions of the fuselage are roughly in the correct proportion and size for a Boeing 767-200:







A closer analysis of the UA175 aircraft using the CG Boeing 767-200 comparison model does show a few differences.

The red part of the United Airlines logo seems to be 'slipping' off the tail fin and the underside reflective strip is absent (the image below shows a real United Airlines Boeing 767-200 with its two underside strip sections marked up with red arrows and the tail fin logo showing correctly).







The starboard engine nacelle doesn't appear to be casting a shadow on the underside of the starboard wing. Although the airframe shows the expected differential lighting it is surprisingly dark given the observable fact that it is being exposed to direct sunlight as evidenced by the two specular highlights on the airframe. These two specular highlights seen on the nose tip and on the starboard wing root are very slightly misplaced. Most significantly there is a very faint turquoise haze around the aircraft and the airframe itself is a little too high in comparison the CG model, it is quite possible that the entire aircraft has been added to the photograph.

Some of these observations could possibly be attributed to low image resolution, over or under exposure of the film, ISO/ASA film speed, inaccuracies in the simulation set up and so on, but others have no rational explanation and imply forgery.







The Robert Clark UA175 aircraft photograph would be a very convincing image of a United Airlines Boeing 767-200 if it weren't for the lighting contradictions, signs of manipulation and other anomalies as mentioned above.


Next - Anthony Cotsifas Photograph - "Here's One I Made Earlier"